Educational Resources

  1. About this research:
  2. Biochar Usage:


Sponsors: over $500,000

  • Bioenergy Research Initiative Program (2015-2018)
  • EPA - P3, Phase II (2015-2017)
  • EPA - P3, Phase I (2014-2015)
  • TVA Ag & Forestry Fund, NC Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services (2013-2014)
  • EPA - P3, Phase II (2011-2013)


Investigators



Current Students

  • Jared Sanborn
    E-mail: sanbornjw@appstate.edu

  • Barry Febos
    E-mail: febosb@appstate.edu

  • Henry Mull
    E-mail: mullhn@appstate.edu

  • Theo Pichalski
    E-mail: pichalskitn@appstate.edu

  • Jon Linck
    E-mail: linckjd@appstate.edu

  • Kevin Burgess
    E-mail: burgesskw@appstate.edu

  • Ryan Slobodzinski
    E-mail: slobodzinskir@appstate.edu

Past Contributors

  • Johnny O'Neal
  • Chris Schoonover
  • Alan Smith
  • Alex Arnold
  • Eric Neff
  • Steve Boedefeld
  • Miranda Harper
  • Dominick Manusos

NEXUS: Biomass Greenhouse-Heating Systems to Extend Growing Seasons for Resource-Limited Farmers


 Objective

Biomass energy generated from livestock manure, other agricultural by-products, and food waste can be an affordable greenhouse-heating energy source for those seeking lower energy costs. Appalachian State University, NC has built a 20 foot by 30 foot greenhouse, called the “Nexus” to reinvent the heated greenhouse by using on-farm biomass resources and solar energy to create year round growing conditions inside a conventional hoop house without dependence on fossil-fuels. Nexus includes an above ground 1500-gallon water storage tank and an aquaculture pond. It is supported by a small-scale pyrolysis system, an anaerobic digestion system, solar thermal, and compost heating. The main purpose of this research is to build and test various inexpensive and efficient biomass heat storage and delivery systems for a greenhouse in order to research and demonstrate how to improve local crop productivity for farmers in Appalachia. The low-cost heating systems will help resource-limited farmers to extend their growing season: 1) increasing the income of local farmers; 2) enhancing the surrounding community’s access to fresh local produce; 3) conserving fossil-fuel; and 4) reducing greenhouse gas emissions associated with greenhouse heating and transportation of non-local produce.


 Nexus System